David Booth

Skirky's picture
What's it called?: 
Find Our Way Back Home
What does it sound like?: 
The sound of the thing is wonderful. If you'd told me he'd recorded it at The Capitol Building in Los Angeles I'd have had no reason to doubt your word - how much of this is down to the proprietal influence of one Nigel Stonier is a moot point, as Booth takes all the credit for production, as well he might - coaxing the sort of tasteful guitar commentary as evinced by the likes of Jerry Donahue out of sideman Andy Trill throughout and blending the shimmering acoustics and satisfyingly roomy-sounding drums into a warm whole. The keening vocals and layered harmonies hark naggingly to a familiar sound, but it isn't until half way through that you realise that you're listening to probably the best album Tim Finn never made. It's purely an accident of geography and chronology that means that Booth hasn't spent the last two decades being feted by the quality press as one of New Zealand's hidden gems, but then being from Matlock will do that for you.
What does it all *mean*?: 
The music bears that tinge of world weariness suggesting that writing sessions started at four in the morning and only finished when the sun came up, washing through the fields, burning off the dew and silhouetting spiderwebs in the hedgerows.
Goes well with …: 
Whisky and ginger, sunrises and melancholic reveries.
Might suit people who like …: 
Crowded House. Armchairs.